SAFETY

 

All Volunteer Coaches must Complete and Submit CDC Concussion Online Training prior to your first game. See Coach’s Corner page for more information

Concussion Safety

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury that changes the way the brain normally works. A concussion is caused by bump, blow or jolt to the head or body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth. Even a “ding,” “getting your bell rung,” or what seems to be a mild bump or blow to the head can be serious.

Did You Know?

  • Most concussions occur without loss of consciousness
  • Athletes who have, at any point in their lives, had a concussion have an increased risk for another concussion.
  • Young children and teens are more likely to get a concussion and take longer to recover than adults.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS

Athletes who experience one or more of the signs or symptoms listed below after a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body may have a concussion.

Signs Observed

  • Appears dazed or stunned
  • Is confused about assignment or position
  • Forgets an instruction
  • Is unsure of game, score, or opponent
  • Moves clumsily
  • Answers questions slowly
  • Shows mood, behavior, or personality changes
  • Can’t recall events prior to hit or fall
  • Can’t recall events after hit or fall

Symptoms Reported by Athlete

  • Headache or “pressure” in head
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Balance problems or dizziness
  • Double or blurry vision
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Sensitivity to noise
  • Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy
  • Concentration or memory problems
  • Confusion
  • Just not “feeling right” or is “feeling down”

ACTION PLAN

If you suspect that an athlete has a concussion, you should take the following four steps:

  1.  Remove the athlete from play.
  2.  Ensure that the athlete is evaluated by a health care professional experienced in evaluating for concussion. Do not try to judge the seriousness of the injury yourself.
  3.  Inform the athlete’s parents or guardians about the possible concussion and give them the CDC fact sheet for parents on concussion.
  4. Keep the athlete out of play the day of the injury and until a health care professional, experienced in evaluating for concussion, says they are symptom-free and it’s OK to return to play.

Additional AYSO Procedures

  • Complete AYSO Incident Report
  • Refer parents to the AYSO/CDC Information sheet and SAI information available at AYSO.org
  • Obtain signed AYSO Participation Release from Parent/Guardian prior to return to play
  • Obtain a Medical Release if required by State Law
  • Give all signed forms to your AYSO Safety Director

Remember
Concussions affect people differently. While most athletes with a concussion recover quickly and fully, some will have symptoms that last for days, or even weeks. A more serious concussion can last for months or longer.

IT’S BETTER TO MISS ONE GAME THAN THE WHOLE SEASON.

Downloadable Concussion Safety Information
Additional Resources